DESIGNING AND DEVELOPING TEACHING MATERIAL OF HUMAN ANATOMY WITH THINKING MAP: WHAT IS INTERNAL RELEVANCE AND CONSISTENCY?

M Haviz

Abstract


The purpose of this study was to investigate the relevance and internal consistency in the design and develop of human anatomy teaching materials using the thinking map. This research is an educational design research consisting of preliminary, prototyping and assessment. At preliminary stage, researcher doing activity of instructional analysis of human anatomy material. At the prototyping stage, researchers designed the prototype of anatomical material using thinking map. Then the prototype is judged by the expert.  Revisions are made on the basis of the expert's assessment. Human anatomical material on the topics: human cells, basic tissues, integument systems, skeletal systems, muscular systems, digestive systems, respiratory systems and reproductive systems used as a content thinking map. Product quality is determined from internal relevance and consistency. The aspect of relevance and internal consistency is determined by the validity the content and construct validity. Indicators contained in the content validity instrument are language, image, subject, curriculum, purpose, concept, constructivism. The construct validity indicators are: consistent, flexible, growing, integrative and reflective. The results showed that the validator assessed 55 thinking maps of human anatomical material that had been designed with a valid mean score. Revisions have been made to improve product consistency. Product thinking map is also done through a good development process. Based on the results and discussion of the research it can be concluded that the human anatomy teaching material has been obtained using a map of thought with good internal relevance and consistency. Broader test or large group test is required to improve product resistance to revisions

Keywords


relevance; internal consistency; human anatomy; thinking map

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@ EDUSAINS.  P-ISSN: 1979-7281; E-ISSN: 2443-1281

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